August 19, 2013

I’m currently relaxing in my apartment, back from one of the busiest weeks I’ve had all summer – summer camp! And while I plan to immediately follow this post up with one about something camp-specific, I’d like to take a moment to discuss what 117 degrees Fahrenheit feels like and how it can effect your life.

And since I know that when Monika reads this, she’ll tell me to stop complaining because it’s been 140 degrees in her site, I’d just like to point out, I’m not complaining, I’m just hoping to hold a useful discussion in case you, the reader, is ever caught in such an enviroment.

Summer didn’t get hot here (I mean in my region of Morocco) until the middle of July, which was blessedly much later than last year. And it didn’t get really hot until this past week. For future reference, “hot” refers to the 90-110-degree range, “really hot” indicates anything over 100.

If you’d like to know what the last week felt like, find yourself a hair dryer. Put it on its highest setting and hold it directed at your face for ten minutes. Ovens also provide useful illustrations.

Mornings would find us waking up already dripping with sweat, literally. Mornings might feel slightly cool on our walk to camp, and by cool, I mean the 80s. That would only last for a couple hours though, because by mid-day, the sun would be out in full force and the wind, instead of cooling us down, would make the heat worse. A hot wind is nothing to play around with.

Camp was over after lunch for us, so there was nothing to do but head back to the house, douse your t-shirt in water, put it on, and cozy up to your favorite frozen water bottle. We had fans, but believe me, there comes a point where the fan does nothing but blow hot air on you.

Because temperatures didn’t usually break until the early morning hours, the entire house of girls took to showering with their pajamas on and then going to sleep wet, half of us on the roof, half of us clustered around open windows.

On Sunday a cold spell came through and I think it only got up into the 80s during the day, which meant we had enough energy for a round of frisbee at camp. Never has 80 degrees felt so cool to me and my Michigan blood.

Even though the weather was hot, it wasn’t as impossible to function as I imagined it would be, back in March when I found out I’d be moving to the south. We had a really successful camp (I will write the post, I promise!). We learned how to fit seven water bottles in a very tiny freezer. I managed to keep up with my Insanity workouts and therefore don’t have to repeat Week 3! The temperature was a challenge. We dealt with it. Region 5 is keeping up the awesome.

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Categories: Camp, Morocco | Tags: | 4 Comments

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4 thoughts on “August 19, 2013

  1. Faye Elder

    Thank you for your post. As I looked through your fb pics of Summer camp, I noticed even the “locals” had shiny sweat on their skin and found myself thinking: “How is she doing this!”. Also the fact that you all seem to have long pants on! (Covering the exposed skin thing I quess). When I think of how extreme heat here in the states, (extreme ha ha to us), completely zaps out strength and any reserves of energy, I am beyond impressed. Go you, Go you. Oh! and are you constantly hydrating?

    • You do get weirdly used to it. Not that it gets comfortable, but not unbearable. I was drinking about three Nalgene bottles of water every day, rotating bottles through the freezer to cool off a bit more.

  2. Bud Sargent

    On the other hand, the Upper Peninsula has had a cooler than usual summer. So I just wanted to pass that bit of information along.

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